Release a VMware Virtual Machine Created by VMware Fusion

On the VM (Linux)

  1. Test Everything
  2. Review configurations
  3. Clean up – get rid of everything that you don’t need (for RPM based Linux):  du -sh /home/*;  ls -lh /tmp; yum clean all; find . -type f -size +100M -exec ls -lh {} \;
  4. Zero the drive space — on linux: cat /dev/zero > zero.fill;sync;sleep 1;sync;rm -f zero.fill

In VMware Fusion (Mac)

  1. Open the Settings UI for the Virtual machine, select the hard drive & click Clean Up Disk
  2. Select the VM in Virtual Machine Library; under select Virtual Machine -> Downgrade Virtual Machine
  3. Copy the vmx & vmdk files

On the Machine with VMware Converter

  1. # vmware-converter-client
  2. Click Convert Machine
  3. Set Source-Type: VMware Workstation or Other VMware virtual machine
  4. Select the vmx file 
  5. Click next
  6. Set Destination Type: Virtual appliance
  7. Enter the VM Name
  8. Enter the Directory to save the new virtual appliance
  9. Set the Distribution Format: Single File (*.ova)
  10. Click next
  11. Edit the Product Information and other text
  12. Click next
  13. Review
  14. Click Finish
  15. Copy ova file

On other VMware machines

  1. Test ova file

RELEASE
PARTY

Ref:
http://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-shrink-vmware-virtual-disk-files-vmdk

DHCP Changes Mac Hostname

By default the Hostname on a Mac will be changed by DHCP. Most of the time, I want my hostname to stay the same. So this can be overridden by setting it in:

/etc/hostconfig
change:

HOSTNAME=-AUTOMATIC-
to read
HOSTNAME=mymac

ref: http://hintsforums.macworld.com/showthread.php?t=29712

Set it in the Terminal with
sudo scutil --set HostName <putinyourhostname_or_fqdn_here>
like in: sudo scutil --set HostName server1.mynetwork.com

OR

   1. System Preferences.
   2. Network
   3. Select your network adapter on the left.
   4. Select "Advanced" button at the bottom.
   5. Set the "DHCP client ID" to your hostname.

ref: http://superuser.com/questions/49891/how-can-i-stop-mac-os-x-overriding-my-hostname-when-i-receive-a-dhcp-request-on-s

RedHat / CentOS EL5 Static IPv6 woes

Does RedHat EL5 / CentOS like doing static IPv6? NO

It is easy to add a static IPv6 address, but it will still auto configure a dynamic one. Many times you don’t care. But sometimes you just want 1 address on the box then….

[root@myhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/network
NETWORKING=yes
NETWORKING_IPV6=yes
HOSTNAME=myhost.mydomain
GATEWAY=1.2.3.1
IPV6FORWARDING=no
IPV6INIT=yes
# this does NOT work, but set it anyway in the hopes that someday it will
IPV6_AUTOCONF=no
IPV6_ROUTER=no
# should be here but had to move to eth0 to prevent an error message
# xIPV6_DEFAULTGW="1:2:3:4::1" 

[root@myhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
# Whatever.... Ethernet
DEVICE=eth0
ONBOOT=yes
BOOTPROTO=static
HWADDR=01:02:03:04:05:06
#
IPADDR=1.2.3.4
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
NETWORK=1.2.3.0
BROADCAST=1.2.3.255
GATEWAY=1.2.3.1
#
# IPV6INIT=yes in network
IPV6ADDR="1:2:3:4::4/64"
IPV6_DEFAULTGW="1:2:3:4::1"

The above “should” be enough, but alas…
(you will probably have to add the line)

[root@myhost ~]# vi /etc/sysctl.conf

...

# Disable IPv6 Autoconf
net.ipv6.conf.default.autoconf=0

Now for the running kernel…

[root@myhost ~]# echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv6/conf/all/autoconf
[root@myhost ~]# echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv6/conf/eth0/autoconf

Finally…

[root@myhost ~]# service network restart